Home » Posts tagged 'Siem Riep'

Tag Archives: Siem Riep

The Haunting Faces of Angkor Thom: A Photo Essay

A Sweaty Selfie at Angkor Thom.

A Sweaty Selfie at Angkor Thom.

Angkor Thom was probably my favorite location of all that we visited in Southeast Asia. There’s an aura that is simply magical. I found myself standing– high up amongst the faces in the ruins– and I got kind of emotional. How incredibly lucky was I to actually be standing there? It was one of those moments that words fail. Hopefully, these images will explain it all.

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Thom (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat in Black & White: A Photo Essay

Here are some more images from our visit to Angkor Wat, Siem Riep, Cambodia. I did filter them to age them. If you ever find yourself in this part of the world– visiting here is a must! Photos can only go so far in bringing the awe-factor through the lens.

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

 

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Angkor Wat (Photo credit: Jeff Linamen)

Hello, Goodbye

Southeast Asia Travel Day Six: Our last morning in Cambodia, breakfast then off to the airport. We were sad to say goodbye to our guide, Jun. He’s a great guy and a terrific guide. One of the best I’ve ever encountered. Jun didn’t just point things out and spout memorized facts. He was genuinely passionate about it. Jun and Peaches from Trails of Indochina really made everything about our three days in Siem Riep perfect.

There was a little drama when we got to the airport. First they were shifting our group from one counter to another and we had to deal with some awfully cranky ticket agents. I think I jinxed us by posting that we had no delays with our previous flights. Our flight from Siem Riep, Cambodia to Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam ended up being delayed about two hours.

When it was finally time to board, Michael went through and I got pulled to the side. One of our friends, Mary, was laughing— “What did you do?” Then she and her husband George got pulled too. The laughing stopped. The gate agents moved us from the front of the plane to the back, a row in front of each other.

Once onboard, the woman next to me wanted to switch because her friend was in front of her. It worked out great because then I got to sit with Mary and George. Michael was still at the front of the plane and we were about 30 rows behind. The good news is that we were able to board and exit at the back of the plane and didn’t have to wait for the usual crowded aisles.

When it came time for the safety video, the screen above our heads decided to throw a fit. It kept lowering and raising, opening and closing, over and over. This got Mary and I laughing, though George, who isn’t crazy about flying—was not amused.

The bus ride from the airport was insane. Traffic, amplified by the ridiculous number of motorbikes, made traffic in New York City or Chicago look like driving in a small town. Michael compared it to the swarm that develops when you step on an anthill. It was pretty intense.

Instead of getting to the hotel after 4 PM, we didn’t get in until after 7 PM. We were pretty tired. After checking in, Michael and I just went up to the lounge on the 19th floor, checked out the view and had a snack. We had a full day tour the next day. I think I fell asleep as soon as I hit the sheets.

 

IMG_2653

Ho Chi Minh City at night.

Last Day In Cambodia

Southeast Asia Travel Day Five: We slept a little later this morning and still managed to beat most of our group down to breakfast. It’s so quiet and relaxed here. Even with the rush of people coming and going there’s still a peaceful air about things here.

The shore near the boat dock at Tonle Sap Lake.

The shore near the boat dock at Tonle Sap Lake.

After breakfast, we boarded coach buses to transport us out to the river that would carry us to the floating village on the banks of Tonle Sap Lake. There was one rather lengthy delay with traffic stopped in both directions due to road construction… just a subtle reminder of home.

On Tonle Sap Lake.

On Tonle Sap Lake.

Tonle Sap Lake. It was nice and hot by the time we reached the boat launch for our cruise around Tonle Sap Lake. There is a whole community that literally lives on the lake. Homes, stores, schools, churches and restaurants float near the shoreline. What’s really interesting is that they don’t use the water for anything–not even washing clothes– because it is pretty muddy and not safe to drink.

This young boy contributes to his family's income by giving visitors back massages.

This young boy contributes to his family’s income by giving visitors back massages.

There was a young boy on our boat that gave nearly everyone on board a short back and shoulder massage. We were each encouraged to give him a dollar. He goes to school and this was how he helps support his family.

From the boat, we headed to a local restaurant for lunch before returning to the hotel.

Welcome Dinner and Show. Our last night in Cambodia, the entire group that came to Siem Riep for the BOTHS5 pre-cruise were together for the first time. About half were staying at another hotel nearby.

Behind the pool area at our hotel (Raffles) was an open air space with a stage. It was set up– with no better words to describe it—like a large wedding reception. Around the perimeter of the space were many food stations with different foods being prepared, similar to a buffet.

Local dancers entertained with traditional dances.

Local young people entertained with traditional dances.

After introductions, the show consisted of young local performers sharing different forms of traditional dance. We recognized a few of them as wait staff from the hotel.

The best part of the evening was a pleasant surprise. We were reunited with a wonderful woman named Janet we met on the Baltic cruise two years ago.

Cambodian Takeaways. Dogs. I saw quite a few dogs in Cambodia. They all appeared to be descendants of the same breed. Dogs in Cambodia are not domesticated the way they are in the U.S. and can be seen wandering about and sometimes sleeping in the parks and streets. I didn’t see much interaction with people; they seemed to just coexist.

Bug Spray and Shorts. We were told ahead of time to bring bug spray for our excursions. It may just be the time of year but we never needed it. We were also told we needed to dress modestly; no bare shoulders and no shorts when visiting temples. As it turned out, this didn’t apply to the ancient ruins or any of the other places we visited in Cambodia. I didn’t even bother to pack shorts because of the advance warning and I really wish I had. With temperatures in the 90s and high humidity, I spent most days soaked in sweat and more uncomfortable than I needed to be.

A Proud and Gracious Culture. In spite of its shortcomings, Cambodians seem to be proud citizens. They are realistic and still thankful for they have. I never got the feeling from anyone we talked with that there was anger towards the government; or a sense of entitlement that so many Americans seem to possess. All the people we saw or met were friendly and gracious. Not one person ever responded with anything less than a smile.

Tourism is still a small but very important part of the economy in Cambodia. The people are well aware that it (tourism) is growing by leaps and bounds in other nearby countries such as Vietnam. A day didn’t go by without multiple people thanking us for choosing to visit their community.

It’s difficult when you visit other cultures and see people that work so hard and have so little—they might have little food or lack conveniences like electricity; yet they still seem happy and content. It makes you stop and reevaluate what you have and what you take for granted.

The floating village on Tonle Sap Lake.

The floating village on Tonle Sap Lake.

 

One of many floating homes on Tonle Sap Lake.

One of many floating homes on Tonle Sap Lake.

The Majestic Beauty of the Angkors

Southeast Asia Travel Day Four: Michael and I were both up and wide awake way too early this morning. Not that unusual for me but Michael is usually a good sleeper. Between jet lag and the exciting day ahead, it was difficult to go back to sleep.

Silly Selfies at Ta Prohm.

Silly Selfies at Ta Prohm.

We were the first ones at breakfast and there was an incredible spread. So many choices from traditional breakfast to local cuisine– everything that Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor does is first class.

In regards to this trip, today was probably my most anticipated day. That can be dangerous this early in a long vacation but there are also so many unique and exciting things ahead. As a precaution, I try not to allow my expectations to be too high; just to avoid any chance of disappointment.

Today did not disappoint.

Today was one of those few days in your life you’ll remember forever. A whirlwind of experiences that totally consumes you. Every sense heightened and challenged. Memories indelibly imprinted in your mind.

I have a bit of an obsession with history and what was left behind. I’m not as consumed by the facts as I am the aura of the experience. To put it bluntly: I like old things.

History not only connects us from the past to where we are now; it connects us metaphysically to all the people that came before us. For me, it’s magic. It gives me chills. There’s nothing else like it in the world.

On the Road to… This was our first opportunity to meet some of the people that would be continuing on with the Broadway On the High Seas 5 (BOTHS5) cruise. About 80 of the nearly 300 BOTHS5 participants came to Siem Riep for the 3-day pre-cruise adventure. As we’d find out later, the group was pretty evenly divided between three choices of hotels; then split again into groups of about a dozen for our tour experiences in Siem Riep. This gave us a perfect opportunity to meet new friends, more intimately; prior to the whole group coming together in Ho Chi Minh (Saigon) in a few days.

On the road in our tuk-tuk.

On the road in our tuk-tuk.

We all boarded tuk-tuks for the short ride to Angkor Wat. What a fun and relaxing way to travel!

Some tuk-tuks are bicycle-driven but most are now powered by motor bikes.

We were all connected to our guide, Jun, by headset so he was able to narrate the sites along the way.

Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat. Depending on the source, Angkor Wat is frequently called the unofficial 8th wonder of the world. It’s often on lists of must see places in your lifetime. I think all the Angkor temples (as a group) should be included.

Bas Reliefs at Angkor Wat.

Bas Reliefs at Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat was built in the early part of the 12th century, over a 30 year period. The workmanship is almost impossible to comprehend. From a distance, it looks like a massive, crumpling stone ruin. As you get closer, the impressive detail begin to be revealed. There are so many elements to be appreciated. The bas reliefs alone contain more than 12,000 square feet of intricate sandstone carvings. What stands out most about Angkor Wat from the other temples is the size. It’s pretty incredible that it has survived the centuries and much of the detail is in such good condition.

 

Inside the heart of Angkor Wat.

Inside the heart of Angkor Wat.

 

Looking up in one of the entries in Angkor Wat.

Looking up in one of the entries in Angkor Wat.

 

One of the statues of Budha.

One of the statues of Budha.

 

Monks can be seen throughout Angkor Wat.

Monks can be seen throughout Angkor Wat.

 

Incredibly detailed exterior walls protect the inner temple.

Incredibly detailed exterior walls protect the inner temple.

 

One of the Angkor Wat towers and balconies.

One of the Angkor Wat towers and balconies.

 

A cemetery at Angkor Wat.

A cemetery at Angkor Wat.

Tomb Raider, Jungle Temple or Ta Prohm? Here is a spot that nearly everyone is familiar with, even if they don’t realize it. Most famously recognized from Tomb Raider, Ta Prohm has survived from its origins in the mid 12th century.

The famous Banyan tree root snakes its way through the temple.  There are hundreds of statues in the complex. Ta Prohm is under a long, delicate preservation and restoration process. Primarily, this involves structural strengthening to prevent any further, rapid deterioration.

The famous Banyan root at Ta Prohm.

The famous Banyan root at Ta Prohm.

 

The Banyan tree rising out of the temple.

The Banyan tree rising out of the temple.

 

Deteriorating but naturally beautiful.

Deteriorating but naturally beautiful.

 

Angkor Thom. It means the great city. It is the temple of faces. Each tower has four carved faces so they can be seen from any direction. Angkor Thom was the final capital of Khmer Empire. The city was surrounded by a wall with  causeways lined with 54 statues on each side leading to the entry towers. Inside the ruins is the magnificent Bayon Temple… a sight to behold.

 

The causeway and entryway to Angkor Thom.

The causeway and entryway to Angkor Thom.

 

Statues lining the causeway.

Statues lining the causeway.

 

The Bayon Temple of Angkor Thom.

The Bayon Temple of Angkor Thom.

 

Looking down in the maze of pathways at Angkor Thom.

Looking down in the maze of pathways at Angkor Thom.

 

Four faces surround every tower.

Four faces surround every tower.

 

I took nearly 800 photos today. In an effort to try and keep up with posting here, I’m only sharing a few now. Later I’ll do a couple photo essay posts with many more pictures of the Angkor temples. This was such an incredible experience.

Just Clowning Around: Cambodian Circus-Style

Southeast Asia Travel Day Three (Part Two): After a short nap, we went across the French gardens in front our hotel to check out the Flying Foxes that hang in the trees. Cambodian Flying Foxes are actually large fruit bats. Their wings can span up to five feet. In late afternoon and early evening you can see them flying from the trees.

IMG_1598

Cambodian Flying Foxes.

Tonight was the only night that we didn’t have dinner or tour plans while in Siem Riep. Researching various options, Michael found us a dinner and show package just around the corner from our hotel.

Phare, The Cambodian Circus. After exploring some of the local streets, we arrived at the Phare complex and were immediately enamored with the quaint and magical atmosphere. There’s a charming midway, gift shop full of beautiful items made by local artisans, the cafe and the big top circus tent. We arrived at the Phare Cafe for a really nice dinner before an evening at the circus. The food was incredibly good and ridiculously inexpensive.

 

The midway at Phare, the Cambodian Circus.

The midway at Phare, the Cambodian Circus.

Phare blends circus arts with artistic expression. All of Phare’s productions have elements of Cambodian history and culture embedded in the story. Their goals are to build tourism and community development; through their students- building human development and social change.

“Phare Performing Social Enterprise has three complimentary social missions: Provide gainful employment to Cambodian youth from difficult social and economic backgrounds, financially sustain our parent organization Phare Ponleu Selpak NGO school thereby contributing to the rebirth of Cambodian modern art.” — Phare website

The ghosts in Preu (Chiils).

The ghosts in Preu (Chills).

The show we saw was called Preu (Chills). It was about a group of students, haunted by ghosts. Through them, they they find ways to face their fears and anxieties.

These young performers and musicians are wonderfully skilled entertainers. It was a fun and excited experience and a great introduction into Cambodian life and culture.

 

The talented student performers of Phare.

The talented student performers of Phare.

 

Musicians sit high above the big top floor adding drama to the performance.

Musicians sit high above the big top floor adding drama to the performance.

 

Phare, The Cambodian Circus

Phare, The Cambodian Circus

Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor

Southeast Asia Travel Day Three: We arrived at the beautiful Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor at 11 AM, November 1st, not expecting to be able to check in until 4 PM. We’d packed a carry on so we could use the pool while we waited– but as luck would have it, we were able to check as soon as we arrived.

IMG_1554The historic 5-star hotel first opened in 1932. It welcomed the beginning of travelers coming to the region to visit the ancient Angkor temples.

It is situated on 15 acres which includes several classic French gardens and boasts the largest swimming pool in Cambodia.

We couldn’t have selected a better place to call home for the three days we’re in Siem Riep. Everything about it is classic. It has the desired modern amenities while maintaining all of its original, traditional charm.

The entire staff is very friendly, helpful and perfectly accommodating. They truly go out of their way to make you comfortable and welcomed. It’s a luxurious experience without the pretense.

We checked in, briefly settled into our room; then did a little exploring of the grounds before returning to our room for a much needed nap.

Raffles Grand Hotel d'Angkor.

Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor.

 

Raffles pool is the largest in Cambodia.

Raffles pool is the largest in Cambodia.

 

The working, vintage lift.

The working, vintage lift.

 

Our Room facing the balcony.

Our Room facing the balcony.

 

Our room in the original 1930's building of the Raffles Grand Hotel d'Angkor.

Our room in the original 1930’s building of the Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor.

 

The view from our balcony.

The view from our balcony.