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Day and Night in Lyon, France

5/26/17- Lyon is the third largest city in France but it doesn’t feel like a big city. It has a historic and classical feel while maintaining the charm of a small town. There are many things to see and do here– unfortunately, we only grazed the surface.

 

(NOTE: More content will be added at a future date as I continue to reorganize entries on my blog.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Travel Date: May 26, 2017, Friday (Day 14)

Playbill Travel’s “Broadway On the Rhone”

A Taste of Twin Cities: Tournon-sur-Rhône and Tain-l’Hermitage

5/25/17- Today we had the opportunity to explore the twin cities of Tournon-sur-Rhône and Tain-l’Hermitage in the heart of the Côtes du Rhône, wine-producing region of southern France. Separated by the Rhone River and connected by the 1847 Marc Sequin Suspension Bridge (original 1824), the two cities are easily accessible to one another via this historic pedestrian bridge.

 

The design of the Marc Sequin Suspension Bridge inspired the design of New York’s Brooklyn Bridge and the construction of many other bridges across Europe.

 

Tournon frames the Marc Sequin Suspension Bridge from the Tain-l’Hermitage side of the Rhone River.

 

We were docked on the Tain-l’Hermitage side of the river and began our visit touring there first. Of the two cities, Tain-l’Hermitage has the more modern, industrial town center. Though it doesn’t feel at all touristy, it has received many visitors including Thomas Jefferson.

 

Fountain in the square, Tain-l’Hermitage, with their famous vineyard hills in the background.

 

Looking up the steep hillside vineyard.

 

The vineyards above Tain-l’Hermitage.

 

With a population of just under 6,000, Tain-l’Hermitage has a relaxed, small town feel that is very welcoming. We enjoyed a wine-tasting at the famous Cave A Vins Fromages. We sampled many different local wines from the region.

I’ll say this: I’m really not a fan of the red wines from southern France. Of course, this should mean nothing to a true wine connoisseur. I know next to nothing about what makes a good wine– only what I like. Of the probably (close to) two dozen red wines I sampled during this trip, I might have liked one or two. On the other hand, I enjoyed nearly all the white wines from the region.

 

Ready for our wine tasting.

 

Across from the shop, we wandered through a rather large open air market before leisurely walking back towards the Rhone river.

 

Crossing the Marc Sequin Bridge to Tournon.

 

Ruins on the hillside in Tournon.

 

The steeple and clock tower of St. Vincent.

 

A view of the city of Tournon on the Rhone River.

We finished our visit across the bridge in the (older) city of Tournon. With a population of about 11,000, it remains a quiet, pleasant little town; not unlike many others found throughout Europe. We enjoyed a relaxing walk through the streets, especially enjoying the sunshine.

Tournon Castle.

 

Facing the river, is a War Memorial created by sculptor Antoine Sartorio on the granite rock below Tournon Castle.

 

The streets of Tournon.

 

We spotted these beautiful dogs outside the entrance of Church Saint-Julien in Tournon.

 

Church Saint-Julien in Tournon, France.

 

Caisse d’Epargne in the town centre of Tournon-sur-Rhône, Ardèche, France.

 

Roof peaks and towers of the Gabriel Faure School, Tournon-sur-Rhône, Ardèche, France.

 

Comprehensive School Gabriel Faure founded in 1536. “Lycée Gabriel Faure”.

 

The Vineyards of Tain-l’Hermitage, against a beautiful blue sky, as we crossed the bridge, returning to our ship.

 

Our floating home on Rhone River, Uniworld’s luxury ship, the S.S. Catherine.

 

James Barbour In Concert.

 

James Barbour.

 

JAMES BARBOUR just finished starring on Broadway for nearly three years as The Phantom in The Phantom of the Opera. He has also starred on Broadway as Sydney Carton in A Tale of Two Cities (Drama Desk, Drama League, Outer Critics Circle awards nominations), Czolgosz in Assassins, The Beast in Beauty & the Beast, Billy Bigelow in Carousel, Officer Lockstock in Urinetown and Edward Rochester in Jane Eyre (Drama League nomination). James also appeared on Broadway in Cyrano, opposite Jeremy Irons in Camelot and in the national tour of The Secret Garden. Other recent credits: Jean Valjean in Les Misérables (LA Ovation Award, Best Actor), Daryl Van Horne in The Witches of Eastwick (U.S. premiere), Daddy Hogan in Anna Nicole (BAM). TV: “The District,” “Just Shoot Me,” “Flashpoint,” “Sex and the City,” “Ed,” “That’s Life,” “Beauty & the Beast in Concert” (CBS), “Great Performances,” “An American Experience,” “A Tale of Two Cities” (PBS). Film: Alchemy, Adam Sandler’s Eight Crazy Nights, Waiting for Lefty, Twinkle Toes with Sally Kirkland. Recordings: Broadway in Concert, The Gift, Dracula, Tears from Heaven, The Count of Monte Cristo, Excalibur, his many cast recordings and two solo CDs, A Gift of Christmas and Bring Me Giants. He hosts TV’s “James Barbour Now” on WITNation.com. His production company, Laughing Dog Media, creates and controls original content for VoiceAmerica.tv’s new Internet TV network. JamesBarbour.com

 

Broadway On the Rhone concert performed by James Barbour.

 

We thoroughly enjoyed James Barbour’s evening of story and song. He has a rich, beautiful voice and masterfully connected his passion to the heart of the audience.

 

Broadway’s current Phantom, James Barbour entertains on Playbill Travel’s Broadway On the Rhone.

 

Travel Date: May 25, 2017, Thursday (Day 13)

Playbill Travel’s “Broadway On the Rhone”

Travel 2017: A Special Concert in Viviers: Day Twelve

We woke up this morning to another beautiful sunrise. This time, docked at Viviers in southern Ardèche, we had the beautiful Viviers Suspension Bridge in full view from our balcony. We’ve had the most wonderful weather in southern France!

 

Viviers Suspension Bridge.

 

We decided ahead of time to join our friends for a morning walking tour of Vivier.

Our small group entered town, enjoying a relaxing walk under the canopy of ancient Plane trees before reaching the town’s center. We then slowly made our way to the upper town, as our guide gave us some history and noted points of interest along the way.

The small commune of Viviers, dates back to the 5th century. Today, it has less than 4,000 residents. It is a medieval town that has largely escaped the ravages of time. Scenes from the 2000 movie, Chocolat (Johnny Depp), were filmed here.

 

Strolling to town under a canopy of Plane Trees.

 

The Quiet Streets of Viviers.

 

A Famous Viviers Butcher Shop.

 

Sausages, anyone?

 

One of the buildings tied to an interesting piece of local history is the Maison des Chevaliers, or the House of the Knights. The age of the actual structure of the building is unknown but the fascade was constructed between 1545 and 1560. Several houses were combined to create what was to become the House of Knights for Noel Albert.

Albert, a rich merchant– had converted to Protestantism, opposed the king– and as a result, was tried and beheaded in 1568. As bailiff of the bishop of Viviers, he was believed to have been skimming money from the taxes he collected as well.

 

On the left, Maison des Chevaliers, the House of the Knights.

 

Marianne- Goddess of Liberty.

 

Beautiful Centuries-Old Buildings.

 

Roses climb many of the buildings’ fascades in Viviers.

 

Morning Sunlight Seemed to Stream Through Every Possible Nook and Cranny as we approach the entrance to Viviers Cathedral.

 

Saint-Michel Tower (11th century) of the St. Vincent Cathedral.

 

Entering a covered passageway in Viviers.

 

The Sampzon House (16th Century) Viviers, France.

 

Saint Vincent Cathedral.

 

Beautiful scenic spots everywhere.

 

Looking out over Viviers and the countryside.

 

The Fortress Walls of Viviers from the Upper Town.

 

Medieval St. Vincent Cathedral.

 

Gargoyles of St. Vincent.

 

Viviers Rooftops from Belvédère de Châteauvieux.

 

Viviers From Belvédère de Châteauvieux.

 

Château de l’Ourse in Belvédère de Châteauvieux Square.

 

We visited the shop of Jean Luc Allonneau, Atelier 3 Ceramiques where he has been handcrafting functional ceramic pieces since 1981. After a tour of his workshop, he gave us a brief demonstration at the potters’ wheel.

Independent craftsmen like this are finding it more and more difficult to stay open and competitive with the accessibility of mass produced goods– priced much lower but of inferior material and design.

Jean Luc still hand selects his materials and completes each piece entirely on his own. The process for each, takes more than a month to complete with drying, firing and glazing to be done. He produces pots and dinnerware collections in addition to some pieces created from handmade molds.

 

Atelier 3 Ceramiques Handcrafted Pottery Shop.

 

Inside Atelier 3 Ceramiques pottery.

 

Jean Luc Allonneau at work.

 

On the street in Viviers. The 11th Century Clock Tower on the right.

 

Viviers is the  birthplace of the Society of Lime and Cement Lafarge. Naturally occurring hydraulic limestone is mined here. The lime is burned to create a product that is used in mortar for construction.

I was particularly interested in this because the brick in our own 1889 house– is held together with a lime-mortar that has to be specially mixed for tuck-pointing (repair).  It is seldom used today in new construction– now, mostly Portland Cement. The advantages of lime include a slow drying process and a much stronger, resilient, finished product.

 

Mining Lime Lafarge.

 

On our way back to the ship, we stopped for a photo op with our friends before returning to the ship for a late lunch. We had a few hours before we would walk back into town for a special concert Playbill had arranged for us.

 

Group Photo Op with Friends.

 

Viviers Cathedral aka St. Vincent Cathedral. Earlier in the day, we didn’t have a chance to go inside the cathedral but we saw the exterior from virtually every angle. I suppose, aside from the fact that we saw the performers entering to rehearse, when we passed in the morning– the main reason was: we’d return for our special concert in the afternoon.

St. Vincent Cathedral, built in the 11th century, is the smallest, if not the oldest, medieval cathedral in France that is still active today.

During the French Wars of Religion between the Catholics and the Protestants in the 16th century, the vaulted ceiling was destroyed. It was not  rebuilt until the 18th century.

At the front of the church, in the semicircular apse, hang all but one of their highly prized tapestries. Two were stolen from the church in the 1970’s and one was later recovered (found in Italy). The famous 18th century royal tapestries were manufactured by Gobelins in Paris, representing scenes from the Bible. You can see the empty frame of the stolen tapestry, which depicted The Last Supper, in the picture below.

 

 

Inside St. Vincent Cathedral, Viviers.

 

Chandelier in St. Vincent.

 

Concert at Viviers Cathedral. This was a first for Playbill Travel. Not only were we getting a concert in a beautiful venue– they were doing a second concert for the entire town, after ours. So you might say– ours was the dress rehearsal. (Wink.)

 

Left to Right, James Barbour, Liz Callaway, Rebecca Luker and Paulo Szot open “A Concert at Viviers Cathedral”.

 

The concert truly was special. Having the chance to hear some of the great music of Broadway, resonating through this beautiful cathedral was breathtaking. The performances were great and the setting gave it an added magical touch. James Barbour, Liz Callaway, Rebecca Luker, John McDaniel and Paulo Szot all received a well-deserved standing ovation. A truly memorable event.

 

James Barbour.

 

Rebecca Luker ‘s angelic voice fills the cathedral with “The Sound of Music”.

 

Paulo Szot’s inspiring and thunderous, “The Impossible Dream”, was one of the highlights .

 

Liz Callaway relives “Memory” from Cats.

 

Musical Director John McDaniel singing, “Anyone Can Whistle.

 

James Barbour and Rebecca Luker serenade one another.

 

Paulo Szot and Liz Callaway share a tender moment, singing Sondheim’s “With So Little To Be Sure Of”.

 

The Broadway on the Rhone Performance in St. Vincent Cathedral, Viviers, France.

 

We found out later, that after our concert, several of the performers thought they’d get a bite to eat in town between shows. Only one problem– everything had closed down because everyone was going to the concert! The whole town attended, including the mayor. Some said they didn’t know what to expect from the concert. Very quickly they were drawn in, thrilled when they recognized some of famous Broadway tunes. The crowd loved it and it was a huge success.

Bravo, Playbill Travel!

 

Travel Date: May 24, 2017, Wednesday (Day 12)

Travel 2017: A Perfect Day In Avignon: Day Eleven

Traveling to new places can certainly be a mixed bag of experiences. I learned a long time ago not to let expectations get in the way of the experience itself. Even if you’ve spent a lot of time researching a destination in advance, there are always surprises along the way. Something might be closed. There may be a new exhibit or a festival that suddenly draws your attention. It could be overcrowded or timing may play an important role. Weather may also be an important factor. Whatever the situation when you arrive, flexibility is the key.

During our stop in Avignon, we had six optional excursions to choose from. Four were included- a walking tour of Avignon, a walking/tram tour (for gentle walkers), the Pont du Gard Aqueduct, or kayaking on the Gardon river. Two offerings, for an additional charge, included: A cooking class with a master chef at the Hotel la Mirande, or Chateauneuf-du-Pape wine tasting.

I was interested in seeing the Aqueduct but that meant sacrificing a visit to Avignon and the Palace of the Popes. So it was hard to choose. Michael and I ended up deciding we wanted the adventure of exploring Avignon on our own. I thought to ask our Cruise Manager Tania, if there was an admission ticket to the Palace of the Popes, which there was. She had a few tickets on hand, for those not taking the tour that wanted to explore on their own. Good thing I asked!

One other thing– in each city we docked, Uniworld had maps available to take with us, whether we went with a guided group or not. Taking one today was especially beneficial.

 

The Medieval rampart surrounding Avignon.

 

We crossed the main road that runs along the Rhone river and entered the fortified walls of Avignon.

Avignon dates back to at least the 6th century BC under Greek domination. Naples and France each had their own piece of early history here. By the 1300’s, it became the residence of the Popes– seven in all would make Avignon their home before the Papacy returned to Rome as the permanent residence. In addition, multiple plagues had a big impact on the city over the centuries.  While the current city population is about 90,000, only about 12,000 live with the ancient city center that is surrounded by looming medieval ramparts.

We walked through narrow streets, into the city, finding ourselves in the Place de l’Horloge. Not only is it considered the city center, it is one of the most perfect squares (I’ve seen so far) in Europe. It was still early in the day when we arrived. The hour was reflected by the activities of the merchants and restaurateurs busily preparing to open up shop. What made it so perfect was the blend of colorful shops, historic buildings and an old world atmosphere that hadn’t been completely modernized or commercialized. It still had so much charm.

 

The streets of Avignon.

 

A restaurant along the Place de l’Horloge in Avignon.

 

Hotel de Ville, (City Hall) Avignon.

 

The clock tower of the Hotel de Ville.

 

The theatre in Place de l’Horloge, Avignon.

 

Bank of France in Avignon.

 

Just a few blocks away was the Square Below the Palace of the Popes (Place du Palais). Not quite as charming as Place de l’Horloge but still historically beautiful and well preserved. There we found an artist was setting up to sell his work. Across the square, an accordionist played his squeezebox; busking at the steps of the Palace.

 

Vendors and artists setting up in front of The Old Mint (Hotel des Monnaies) across from the Palace of the Popes. Built in 1619, it has housed the Avignon School of Music since 1860.

 

One of the buskers near the Palace of the Popes.

 

Notre-Dame des Doms Cathedral.

 

Palace of the Popes.  The Palais des Papes is one of the 10 most visited monuments in France. It is the largest Gothic palace in Europe. Built in the 14th century, it was first home to Popes, then Legates,  and finally Vice-Legates up until the French Revolution. Six papal conclaves were held here.

 

Palace of the Popes in Avignon, France.

 

The majority of the palace was constructed in less than 20 years.

Over 20 rooms can be explored during your visit.  Most of the ornate embellishments that were the finishing touches of later Popes, are now gone. One of the most interesting areas of the palace are the Popes’ private chambers– with original frescoes painted by the Italian artist Matteo Giovannetti. (No photography allowed.)

The palace was first opened to the public in the early 1900s. Today, exhibitions and performances are held here year-round. It is interesting that the palace has not been turned into a museum house in the way that many historic places have been. Here, the focus is on the magnificence of the building and architecture itself.

 

Sunlight bursting through a door of the medieval Palace of the Popes.

 

Incredible detailed art on the arched ceilings, entering the Palace.

 

Silhouettes of an art exhibition, inside the courtyard of the Palace of the Popes.

 

Interior courtyard view of the Palace of the Popes.

 

Sacristie Nord in the Palace of the Popes.

 

The Grand Chapelle.

 

The incredible brickwork in the Grand Chapelle of the Palace of the Popes.

 

Looking out of ornate Gothic windows of the Palais des Papes.

 

Walking the rooftop terraces of the Palace.

 

The Spires of the Palace of the Popes from the roof.

 

Looking down on the Honor Courtyard, used today for performances and home of the Avignon Theater Festival.

 

Avignon from the roof of the Palace of the Popes.

 

The gilded statue of the Virgin Mary tops the Avignon Cathedral, also known as Notre-Dame des Doms Cathedral.

 

 

Looking out towards Notre-Dame des Doms Cathedral (from the Palace) containing the mausoleum of Pope John XXII.

 

The bell tower above the Palace of the Popes.

 

One of the elaborate entrances to the Palace.

 

Exterior of the Palace of the Popes.

 

From the Palace, we wandered through the streets of Avignon, passing many shops and small theatres on our way to the Rocher des Doms Garden overlook. We strayed from the main path, discovering some unique passages and paused a moment to watch a sculptor at work.

 

Off the beaten path in Avignon.

 

A Sculptor at work.

 

Finding our own way to the top of the hill.

 

Many steps twist and turn to the top of the overlook.

 

After winding our way around, climbing many steps, we found ourselves at the top of the Rocher des Doms Garden Overlook. The gardens and panoramic views were nothing short of spectacular. It was just incredible up there. I couldn’t help but wonder if our cruise mates were going to miss out on all this beauty, or be rushed through, to stay on schedule. We had all the time in the world.

 

Fortress and Bishop’s Palace in Avignon.

 

Incredible view of the Rhone river.

 

Looking over Avignon from the hill.

 

I think we found the best view of the famous bridge- Pont d’Avignon or Pont Saint-Bénézet. Originally completed in 1185, it crossed the Rhone, only to be destroyed 40 years later by Louis VIII when taking over Avignon. It was rebuilt with 22 arches but river flooding repeatedly damaged the bridge. The surviving sections of the bridge are believed to have been constructed around 1345, with the Chapel of Saint Nicholas at the middle of the four remaining arches. The bridge is considered an important representation of the city, as well as the inspiration for the song, Sur le pont d’Avignon.

 

The famous Pont d’Avignon– Pont Saint Benezet Chapelle St Nicolas.

 

We took a break, grabbing a drink from a small cafe on the hill, and continued to enjoy our beautiful surroundings. We had perfect weather. It was hard to leave this place but we needed to start making our way back down the hill.

 

Ducks playfully enjoying the garden fountain and pond.

 

Along the garden path.

 

Beautiful Avignon.

 

We reached the bottom of the hill, once again passing the palace and finding ourselves back at Place de l’Horloge. It was a little busier now, the carousel was in motion and tourists were beginning to fill the streets and shops.

 

Back at Place de l’Horloge, Avignon.

 

The carousel, Place de l’Horloge, Avignon.

 

We’d only covered about a third of Avignon but felt like the experience had been totally fulfilling. It was still early afternoon and we could have spent more time but I was anxious to get back to the ship.

 

Lighting Paulo. I ended up volunteering (getting volunteered) to try and help improve the lighting for tonight’s concert. After the daily briefing in the Van Gogh lounge, while everyone else headed to the Cezanne Dining Room for dinner, I stayed and helped the staff transform the lounge into a makeshift theater.

On all the previous Playbill cruises the ships had actual theaters (or performance spaces) with a stage. Being a much small ship, specifically designed for river travel, the S.S. Catherine had only the large Van Gogh Lounge (with no stage) that could accommodate all the guests at one time.

I’m not sure I was able to improve the lighting that much– but at least music director, John McDaniel would be lit. (The night before, he was totally in the dark.) The ship staff seemed grateful for the assistance and asked if I’d hang around for sound check.

 

A Private Moment. There really wasn’t time to go join our group in the dining room– so I went to our regular spot, which coincidentally was just off the lounge– on the front-lower deck of the ship. I got out there just in time to watch as our ship passed through one of the river locks– the first one I got to observe from start to finish. It’s fascinating how it works, moving from different water levels– and the fact that these locks help prevent most of the flooding that could occur along the river is pretty incredible.

 

Going through one of the locks between Avignon and Viviers.

After the lock, we were back in open water. Mostly natural, undeveloped land drifted by– with the occasional building or the remains of some ancient building coming and going from view. The sun was still quite hot as it was slowly starting it’s late afternoon descent from the sky. It was peaceful, quiet, and really a beautiful moment. How lucky I was to be experiencing it!

Late afternoon passing hilltop ruins on the Rhone River.

 

Paulo Szot In Concert. What a voice! Strong, rich, resonant– a joy to listen to. Paulo treated us to a wide variety of songs that included selections from his Tony Award-winning performance in South Pacific to Sondheim. I think the audience favorite had to be his rendition of Stars from Les Miserables; performed in many different languages and ending in English.

 

Paulo Szot.

 

Paulo Szot is one of the most acclaimed and versatile baritones in the world, having garnered international acclaim as both an opera singer and actor. Born in Sao Paulo to Polish immigrants, Szot has appeared in leading roles with many major opera companies throughout the world including the Metropolitan Opera, Paris Opera, La Scala, Dutch National Opera, San Francisco Opera, Rome Opera and Opera Australia. In 2008, he won the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Musical for his portrayal of Emile De Becque in the Broadway revival of South Pacific at Lincoln Center Theater, for which he also won the Drama Desk, Outer Critic’s Circle and Theater World Awards. Szot was the first Brazilian actor to receive such honors. In the recent 2016-2017 season, Szot appeared as Don Alfonso in a new production of Cosi fan tutte at Opera National de Paris and presneted a solo recital at Teatro Royal de Madrid as a salute to Frank Sinatra’s recordings of Antonio Jobim’s bossa novas. He also originated the roles of Alexander Hamilton, Bill Clinton and Dick Cheney in the world premiere of Mohammed Fairouz’s The New Prince at the Dutch National Opera. — Playbill

 

Paulo Szot, Broadway on the Rhone, May 2017.

 

Paulo Szot performing for the Playbill audience.

 

The wonderful Paulo Szot in Concert.

 

Music Director John McDaniel accompanying Paulo Szot in Concert.

 

Going Through the Locks. After the concert, the gang gathered on the deck and we were treated to quite a show. We went through probably the most unique of the locks on our trip– passing under, and then watching the massive gate drop behind us closing our ship in the lock, creating what felt like a medieval dungeon. It was dark and eerie, the ship’s floodlights reflecting off the dark, glistening walls as the water level changed before releasing us back out into the river.

 

Entering one of the more incredible locks we’d pass through on the Rhone river.

 

The S.S. Catherine, Inside the Lock.

 

Leaving the Lock on the Rhone River.

 

It had been quite a day! I always tell people that doing the Playbill cruises is like getting two vacations in one. You enjoy traveling to, and exploring, fascinating destinations– and then you have the wonderful Broadway concert experience on board. Today was the perfect example of the best of both worlds.

 

Travel Date: May 23, 2017, Tuesday (Day 11)

Travel 2017: No Sunday in the Park But the Stars Are Out: Day Nine

Transport to train station: 8 AM. What?!? No! This can’t be! But alas, that was indeed the schedule.

No Sunday in the Park with George…. and Jeff and Michael and Mary.

As I’d posted before our trip, I had hoped we’d be able to spend a little of our Sunday morning on the l’Île de la Grande Jatte– where Georges Seurat spent much time sketching and painting. I guess it was just an art/theatre geek thing. I’d hoped we wouldn’t have been leaving Paris before noon– 10 am at the very earliest. I guess that moment just wasn’t meant to be. Maybe next trip. (You hear that George and Mary?)

The night before, Michael and I somehow managed to pack our large and carry on suitcases inside each other so they would go on the truck ahead of us to the ship. (They told us we could send one bag ahead.) This way we didn’t have to lug a big suitcase on the train.

Everything actually worked out perfectly. We got up, had breakfast, and then it was time to head to the train station. No waiting around, killing time.

We arrived at the Paris station,  Gare de Lyon, with plenty of time to look around the beautiful, building before boarding the high speed TGV train to Avignon.

 

Inside the Paris Gare de Lyon Train Station.

 

Gare de Lyon.

 

It was hard to believe that after the whirlwind adventure we’d had so far– the ‘main event‘ was still ahead! Broadway On the Rhone! This would be our fourth cruise with Playbill Travel but our first-ever river cruise.

 

Our cruise begins!

 

We arrived in the south of France (Avignon) in just under three hours. Even though there wasn’t a lot of unique scenery to speak of, it was a relaxed, comfortable trip.

 

Our ship- Uniworld’s S.S. Catherine docked in Avignon.

 

We were warmly greeted and welcomed aboard the S.S. Catherine by the crew and encouraged to visit the buffet. The rooms wouldn’t be ready for a couple hours so we ate and explored. We saw a number of people had arrived that hadn’t gone to Paris first– so we said our hellos and ended up camping out on the top deck.

It was empty up there– a beautiful sunny day and little hot. We guessed most were choosing to stay inside where it was cooler.

After a bit, we saw people coming up the stairs. It was none other than Grammy and Emmy Award winner,  John McDaniel and his niece! We made introductions, had a nice conversation and then they were off to explore around the ship some more.

A crew member came around and told us we could check in and go to our rooms but our bags might not be there until later. When they arrived, we had enough time to unpack and take a short nap before the security/excursion briefing in the lounge.

The ship set sail, unceremoniously, while the meeting was going on. That was followed by cocktails on the upper deck and the introduction of our cruise’s entertainment: Liz Callaway, Paulo Szot, James Barbour, and Rebecca Luker; with music director, John McDaniel.

 

 

Our ship, the S.S. Catherine, is a small ship, specifically suited for river cruises. It only accommodates 159 guests and 57 staff in 6 suites and 74 staterooms. It has to be short enough to fit under the many low bridges. We would also be passing through 17 locks on the Rhone river from Avignon to Lyon.

The ship has most of the amenities of a larger ship, just scaled down. There’s one large dining room (most ships have three or more) and a big lounge that can hold everyone at one time. There’s also a smaller bar with a ‘pool’ that would be better described as a large hot tub. The only things missing are a gift shop and casino.

One of the first things I noticed, after the Murano chandelier in the lobby, was the beautiful modern art lining all the hallways. Tasteful and appropriate.

 

The Lobby/Reception area of the S.S. Catherine.

 

Sailing on the Rhone River.

 

At 7 pm we met our friends for an enjoyable dinner and then retired early. I always feel exhausted on travel days, I’m not sure why. Looking forward to a new adventure on the day ahead!

 

Travel Date:  May 21, 2017 Sunday (Day 9)

London, Paris, Amsterdam and Broadway on the Rhone

It’s hard to believe this day is finally here! We started planning this trip in February 2016 when Playbill Travel announced their inaugural river cruise. This will be our first as well, while it’s our fourth vacation built around a Playbill Broadway Cruise. This ship, Uniworld’s S.S. Catherine,  holds about half the passengers of the Broadway at Sea cruises from the past few years. This cruise actually sold out before it could go on sale to the public.

We weighed some options and building around the cruise, we came up with a pretty exciting trip. Nineteen days in Europe, start to finish. We start with five days in London, then take the Eurostar train to Paris for three days, followed by the Broadway on the Rhone River Cruise and finally three days in Amsterdam before flying home.

So here’s a quick preview of our trip:

London

Having just visited last September, we saw many of the historical places of interest and found how easy it was to get around using the Tube. This time we’re seeing nine shows (yes, nine shows in 5 days) in the West End. We’re staying at the incredibly beautiful, St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel again which connects directly to the Eurostar at St. Pancras International. When we’re not in the theatre, we hope to visit a few of the museums and places we didn’t have time to get to on our last trip.

Paris

Our first time. So many things we’d like to see and do– but we’re keeping our options open so we can focus on enjoying the ambience of the city. Hotel Scribe will be our home base for a few days. We’re definitely making a trip to Versailles, must see the Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame, we’re seeing the show at Paradis Latin and have a short champagne cruise through Paris on the Seine. I’m really hoping to spend time in the Montmartre district and make a quick visit to the island of Grand Jatte. We’ll probably skip the museums this time and have to plan a longer stay in the future to experience more of what Paris has to offer.

Broadway on the Rhone

Sponsored by Playbill Travel, this Rhone river cruise starts in the south of France and visits: Avignon, Arles, Tarascon, Viviers, Tournon/Tain L’Hermitage, Macon and Lyon. World renowned sommelier Jean-Luc le Du will be on board, sharing his love and knowledge of the wines, cheese and chocolates of the region. Evenings will feature entertainment by Broadway veterans Rebecca Luker, Paulo Szot, Liz Callaway and James Barbour, accompanied by Grammy and Emmy Award winning Music Director, John McDaniel.

Amsterdam

At the top of my bucket list of places to visit has always been the Anne Frank House in Amsterdam. We’ve already booked our tickets. We also booked a half day trip to Zaanse Schans, Voldendam and Marken in the Dutch countryside. Windmills anyone? There are also several museums and a canal cruise we hope to enjoy, not to mention the necessary stroll through the infamous red light district,  known around the world. I think we’re too late for tulips but you never know!

 

I’ll be posting what I can, when I can on social media as well as blog posts of our daily activities– though they may be posted later, depending on time and Internet availability. I hope some of you will follow along– join us on our journey!

 

 

Travel 2016: Day Thirteen – Bonifacio, Corsica, France

Bonifacio is a French commune (city) on the island of Corsica (Corse). It is a fortress city with a modest population of just under 3,000 inhabitants. Though it has a Roman origin, the island changed hands several times and in 1769 was conquered by France. Still, it retains much of its Italian culture to this day.

We tendered in from our ship to the gorgeous little harbour, nestled among the high cliffs of the island. From the port, we took a short train (tram) ride– uphill, to the top of the city sitting high above the sea.

Plaque commemorating the house where Napoleon had once lived.

Plaque commemorating the house where Napoleon had once lived.

After a rather long-winded introduction, our guide took us through the narrow streets of Bonifacio,  pointing out several churches and showing us some of the more breathtaking scenic spots. Along the Rue des Deux Empereurs we saw where Napoleon lodged (1793) and where Charles V had lived (1541), across the street.

Bonifacio has the feel of a resort town, full of history with many quaint shops and restaurants.

Once we were oriented, we were on our own to explore. George, Mary and I chose to take a boat ride from the harbour along the coast while Michael did some shopping along the docks.

As you can see from the pictures, the scenery is just gorgeous. It was all enhanced by perfect weather and great company to share it with.

 

The rocky coast of Corsica.

The rocky coast of Corsica.

 

Looking out at the Mediterranean Sea.

Looking out at the Mediterranean Sea.

 

Michael, George, Mary and I in Bonifacio.

Michael, George, Mary and I in Bonifacio.

 

On the street in Bonifacio.

On the street in Bonifacio.

 

I loved the textures in this shot.

I loved the textures in this shot.

 

A typical street in Bonifacio, Corsica.

A typical street in Bonifacio, Corsica.

 

Looking down towards the stunning harbour.

Looking down towards the stunning harbour.

 

Starting the steep descent from the top of Bonafacio.

Starting the steep descent from the top of Bonifacio.

 

The fortress wall from our little tour boat in the harbour.

The fortress walls from our little tour boat in the harbour.

 

Leaving the harbour.

Leaving the harbour.

 

Inside the Cave of Sdragonato.

Inside the Cave of Sdragonato.

 

You can see where the rock of the island of Corsica changes from limestone to granite.

You can see where the rock of the island of Corsica changes from limestone to granite.

 

Bonifacio sitting high on the linestone cliffs of Corsica.

Bonifacio sitting high on the limestone cliffs of Corsica.

 

Last Night Onboard. The last night of a cruise is always difficult because you’re trying to say goodbye to everyone, pack and get your bags out to be moved off the ship by the staff; plus you still have dinner and a big final show. So between rushing around and trying to get everyone coordinated for our last dinner together, it was kind of a circus.

We made some great new friends and got to spend time with some of our favorite people from past cruises as well. Since many of us live all over the United States, and Anthony and Michael in London– you just never know when you’ll see each other again.

The good news is that quite a few of us have booked the Broadway on the Rhone River Cruise in May so we have that to look forward to in 2017.

The Big Show. Our final show of the cruise featured all of the performers including the ‘Broadway Ambassadors’ that didn’t give solo concerts. Here are a few of the highlights:

  • Faith Prince on stage with her husband Larry Lunetta playing his trumpet.
  • Charles Busch singing “Those Were the Days” – It was a master class in storytelling.
  • Laura Osnes and Lindsay Mendez singing “For Good” – Both got emotional and teary eyed; sweet, spontaneous emotion.
  • Hudson Flynn, Lila Crawford, Juli Wesley performing – Hudson is the multi-talented son of Andrea Burns and Peter Flynn; Lila played Annie in the most Broadway revival and Little Red in the film version of Into the Woods;  and Juli is the wonderful daughter of Seth Rudetsky and James Welsey. (Juli celebrated her 16th birthday on the trip!)
  • West Side Story Quintet – This was the show finale- thrown together in an hour! Featuring Chita Rivera singing Anita ( the role she originated); Andrea Burns (Maria) and husband, director Peter Flynn (Tony) – they met playing those roles in a European tour of West Side Story!;  The rest of the performers made up the Jets and Sharks.

 

Faith Prince

Faith Prince

 

Faith Prince & husband, Larry Lunetta

Faith Prince & husband, Larry Lunetta

 

Lila Crawford

Lila Crawford

 

Chita Rivera

Chita Rivera

 

Adam Pascal

Adam Pascal

 

Charles Busch

Charles Busch

 

Hudson Flynn, Lila Crawford & Juli Wesley

Hudson Flynn, Lila Crawford & Juli Wesley

 

Seth Rudetsky, Music Director and Master of Ceremonies

Seth Rudetsky, Music Director and Master of Ceremonies

 

The Creative Team & Travel Pros for BOTHS7.

The Creative Team & Travel Pros for BOTHS7.

Up Late. A bunch of us congregated afterwards for the last time. Bill, Paul, Janet, Ron and a few others came and went, chatting and saying their goodbyes. Michael left to go put his luggage out- it was supposed to be out by 11:30– and I assured him I was right behind him. As everyone left, Janet and I stopped and chatted for a few minutes with Andrea Burns in the lounge.

I escorted Janet to the elevator than headed back to the room. Of course, me being me, I was late getting my bags out– so they sat there all night. I went up to the casino to meet Michael, we played some slots, then headed back to the room and called it a night.

 

Tomorrow we disembark and head back to Rome for a day at the Vatican.