Home » Lifestyle » Travel 2017: A Special Concert in Viviers: Day Twelve

Travel 2017: A Special Concert in Viviers: Day Twelve

Jeff Linamen

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We woke up this morning to another beautiful sunrise. This time, docked at Viviers in southern Ardèche, we had the beautiful Viviers Suspension Bridge in full view from our balcony. We’ve had the most wonderful weather in southern France!

 

Viviers Suspension Bridge.

 

We decided ahead of time to join our friends for a morning walking tour of Vivier.

Our small group entered town, enjoying a relaxing walk under the canopy of ancient Plane trees before reaching the town’s center. We then slowly made our way to the upper town, as our guide gave us some history and noted points of interest along the way.

The small commune of Viviers, dates back to the 5th century. Today, it has less than 4,000 residents. It is a medieval town that has largely escaped the ravages of time. Scenes from the 2000 movie, Chocolat (Johnny Depp), were filmed here.

 

Strolling to town under a canopy of Plane Trees.

 

The Quiet Streets of Viviers.

 

A Famous Viviers Butcher Shop.

 

Sausages, anyone?

 

One of the buildings tied to an interesting piece of local history is the Maison des Chevaliers, or the House of the Knights. The age of the actual structure of the building is unknown but the fascade was constructed between 1545 and 1560. Several houses were combined to create what was to become the House of Knights for Noel Albert.

Albert, a rich merchant– had converted to Protestantism, opposed the king– and as a result, was tried and beheaded in 1568. As bailiff of the bishop of Viviers, he was believed to have been skimming money from the taxes he collected as well.

 

On the left, Maison des Chevaliers, the House of the Knights.

 

Marianne- Goddess of Liberty.

 

Beautiful Centuries-Old Buildings.

 

Roses climb many of the buildings’ fascades in Viviers.

 

Morning Sunlight Seemed to Stream Through Every Possible Nook and Cranny as we approach the entrance to Viviers Cathedral.

 

Saint-Michel Tower (11th century) of the St. Vincent Cathedral.

 

Entering a covered passageway in Viviers.

 

The Sampzon House (16th Century) Viviers, France.

 

Saint Vincent Cathedral.

 

Beautiful scenic spots everywhere.

 

Looking out over Viviers and the countryside.

 

The Fortress Walls of Viviers from the Upper Town.

 

Medieval St. Vincent Cathedral.

 

Gargoyles of St. Vincent.

 

Viviers Rooftops from Belvédère de Châteauvieux.

 

Viviers From Belvédère de Châteauvieux.

 

Château de l’Ourse in Belvédère de Châteauvieux Square.

 

We visited the shop of Jean Luc Allonneau, Atelier 3 Ceramiques where he has been handcrafting functional ceramic pieces since 1981. After a tour of his workshop, he gave us a brief demonstration at the potters’ wheel.

Independent craftsmen like this are finding it more and more difficult to stay open and competitive with the accessibility of mass produced goods– priced much lower but of inferior material and design.

Jean Luc still hand selects his materials and completes each piece entirely on his own. The process for each, takes more than a month to complete with drying, firing and glazing to be done. He produces pots and dinnerware collections in addition to some pieces created from handmade molds.

 

Atelier 3 Ceramiques Handcrafted Pottery Shop.

 

Inside Atelier 3 Ceramiques pottery.

 

Jean Luc Allonneau at work.

 

On the street in Viviers. The 11th Century Clock Tower on the right.

 

Viviers is the  birthplace of the Society of Lime and Cement Lafarge. Naturally occurring hydraulic limestone is mined here. The lime is burned to create a product that is used in mortar for construction.

I was particularly interested in this because the brick in our own 1889 house– is held together with a lime-mortar that has to be specially mixed for tuck-pointing (repair).  It is seldom used today in new construction– now, mostly Portland Cement. The advantages of lime include a slow drying process and a much stronger, resilient, finished product.

 

Mining Lime Lafarge.

 

On our way back to the ship, we stopped for a photo op with our friends before returning to the ship for a late lunch. We had a few hours before we would walk back into town for a special concert Playbill had arranged for us.

 

Group Photo Op with Friends.

 

Viviers Cathedral aka St. Vincent Cathedral. Earlier in the day, we didn’t have a chance to go inside the cathedral but we saw the exterior from virtually every angle. I suppose, aside from the fact that we saw the performers entering to rehearse, when we passed in the morning– the main reason was: we’d return for our special concert in the afternoon.

St. Vincent Cathedral, built in the 11th century, is the smallest, if not the oldest, medieval cathedral in France that is still active today.

During the French Wars of Religion between the Catholics and the Protestants in the 16th century, the vaulted ceiling was destroyed. It was not  rebuilt until the 18th century.

At the front of the church, in the semicircular apse, hang all but one of their highly prized tapestries. Two were stolen from the church in the 1970’s and one was later recovered (found in Italy). The famous 18th century royal tapestries were manufactured by Gobelins in Paris, representing scenes from the Bible. You can see the empty frame of the stolen tapestry, which depicted The Last Supper, in the picture below.

 

 

Inside St. Vincent Cathedral, Viviers.

 

Chandelier in St. Vincent.

 

Concert at Viviers Cathedral. This was a first for Playbill Travel. Not only were we getting a concert in a beautiful venue– they were doing a second concert for the entire town, after ours. So you might say– ours was the dress rehearsal. (Wink.)

 

Left to Right, James Barbour, Liz Callaway, Rebecca Luker and Paulo Szot open “A Concert at Viviers Cathedral”.

 

The concert truly was special. Having the chance to hear some of the great music of Broadway, resonating through this beautiful cathedral was breathtaking. The performances were great and the setting gave it an added magical touch. James Barbour, Liz Callaway, Rebecca Luker, John McDaniel and Paulo Szot all received a well-deserved standing ovation. A truly memorable event.

 

James Barbour.

 

Rebecca Luker ‘s angelic voice fills the cathedral with “The Sound of Music”.

 

Paulo Szot’s inspiring and thunderous, “The Impossible Dream”, was one of the highlights .

 

Liz Callaway relives “Memory” from Cats.

 

Musical Director John McDaniel singing, “Anyone Can Whistle.

 

James Barbour and Rebecca Luker serenade one another.

 

Paulo Szot and Liz Callaway share a tender moment, singing Sondheim’s “With So Little To Be Sure Of”.

 

The Broadway on the Rhone Performance in St. Vincent Cathedral, Viviers, France.

 

We found out later, that after our concert, several of the performers thought they’d get a bite to eat in town between shows. Only one problem– everything had closed down because everyone was going to the concert! The whole town attended, including the mayor. Some said they didn’t know what to expect from the concert. Very quickly they were drawn in, thrilled when they recognized some of famous Broadway tunes. The crowd loved it and it was a huge success.

Bravo, Playbill Travel!

 

Travel Date: May 24, 2017, Wednesday (Day 12)


1 Comment

  1. Ada says:

    I love your photography! The colors are so beautiful! Love!

    Liked by 1 person

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