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Beach & Banter

Drift wood on Koh Kood.

Drift wood on Koh Kood.

Southeast Asia Travel Day Eleven: Beach & BBQ day today in Koh Kood, Thailand. It was just what you’d expect of a fairly secluded beach on a tropical island– loads of palm trees and lush foliage. There was a huge sandy clearing with tables and chairs for eating and many beach chairs for sunning, down by the water. The crew from the ship hauled all the food and supplies out early before the rest of were tendered to the island dock. We stayed a couple hours- ate and walked the shoreline; then went back to the ship.

 

Our ship, Le Soleal from the beach.

Our ship, Le Soleal from the beach.

 

The beach lagoon at Koh Kood, Thailand.

The beach lagoon at Koh Kood, Thailand.

Looking out to sea from the island of Koh Kood.

Looking out to sea from the island of Koh Kood.

Lindsay Mendez at the autograph signing.

Lindsay Mendez at the autograph signing.

 

The first of two mingle and autograph sessions were held before dinner. Tommy Tune designed the poster for this year’s cruise. About half of the performers did the signing today: Tommy Tune, Christine Ebersole, Norm Lewis, Lindsay Mendez, Seth Rudetsky and Liz Callaway. It was a good chance to talk with them without feeling like you were imposing on their vacation time. On a day-to-day basis, some were more friendly and accessible than others; and we often found an opportunity to chat in passing.

 

Christine Ebersole and Seth Rudetsky (with daughter Juli) signing autographs.

Christine Ebersole and Seth Rudetsky (with daughter Juli) signing autographs.

Hunter Foster & Jennifer Cody chat about their careers and relationship during their evening performance.

Hunter Foster & Jennifer Cody chat about their careers and relationship during their evening performance.

After dinner, Broadway couple- Hunter Foster and his wife Jennifer Cody performed. They did more of a ‘chat and sing’ style performance, hosted by Seth Rudetsky. This was the perfect format for them. Especially, since most of us were less familiar with Jennifer Cody, by name… but most had probably seen her in at least one show if not more. From the shows that were mentioned, I figured Michael and I had seen her at least three or four times in different Broadway shows. We last saw Hunter on closing night in The Bridges of Madison County. They both gave impressive performances together and alone. It was also fun to listen to their witty banter and learn more about their careers and the two of them as a couple.

 

Hunter Foster singing, Empty Chairs at Empty Tables.

Hunter Foster singing, Empty Chairs at Empty Tables.

 

The always bubbly, Jennifer Cody.

The always bubbly, Jennifer Cody.

Back to Cambodia (Sort Of)

Southeast Asia Travel Day Ten: Michael and I woke up ridiculously early, considering we didn’t get to bed until after midnight. We were both up before 3 AM. I took advantage of the time to upload pictures to Facebook and for future blog posts while everyone else was asleep—meaning a faster Internet connection.

I worked on my blog, we watched some TV and explored the ship a bit before getting ready for breakfast. Breakfast has turned out to be my favorite meal of the day on the ship. The bacon is the best I’ve ever had. Apparently, some people were complaining it wasn’t crispy enough and I thought that was pretty funny.

Phil Birsh, President and CEO of Playbill.

Phil Birsh, President and CEO of Playbill.

This morning, Phil Birsh gave a talk about Playbill and its long association with Broadway and theatres around the country. It’s been in his family a long time and they do a wonderful job supporting the theatre community, from Broadway all the way down to providing services for schools.

This afternoon we were anchored in Sihanoukville, Cambodia and many people had excursions planned. We’d researched it before the trip and decided not to leave the ship. Re-entering Cambodia meant we needed another Visa and we felt it wasn’t worth it. None of the excursions appealed to us; besides, it was a short stay of only about four hours. Instead, we took a long nap.

We made the right choice. I didn’t hear one person say they enjoyed their excursion and there were some horror stories from people as well. One group ended up hiking through swampland to get back to dry ground after rain and an aborted tour.

Norm Lewis

Norm Lewis

The Norm Lewis concert was tonight. He’s always phenomenal. There’s just something really extraordinary about the way he connects with an audience—his powerhouse voice is pretty astounding too. Norm was on the Baltic cruise (BOTHS3) too. He’s one of the nicest people you could ever meet.

 

Norm Lewis in Concert.

Norm Lewis in Concert.

 

Norm Lewis brings down the house.

Norm Lewis brings down the house.

Saigon Sailing & Sliding Doors

Sunrise in the harbor.

Sunrise in the harbor.

Southeast Asia Travel Day Nine: Michael and I woke up this morning just as we set sail, leaving the port in Ho Chi Minh City at 5:30 AM. We sailed along the Saigon River heading out to sea. Little did we know that for the next hour we’d be part of some craziness that would be the talk of the ship.

Setting sail in the Saigon River.

Setting sail in the Saigon River.

As the Le Soleal was maneuvering through the river, we’d feel the ship slightly tilting as we sailed. I had jumped in the shower while Michael was dressing. The ship rocked a bit tilting to the left and I heard a loud rushing sound like someone dragging something across the floor. When I came out of the bathroom Michael explained the sound– and our morning adventure began.

Along the Saigon River.

Along the Saigon River.

It seems that when they were getting the ship ready for boarding, someone forgot to lock the wall adjoining our cabin to the one next to us. (With the wall open it is reconfigured as a suite.) So every time the ship tilted to the left, the wall would slide open revealing our neighbors who were sleeping in the next room. I emphasis WERE sleeping.

As the wall opened, Michael was staring directly at them and said he couldn’t think of anything else to say besides, “Good Morning!” Luckily, it was a couple (Peggy Sue and Champ) we’d already met and toured with, so they weren’t complete strangers.

Leaving Ho Chi Minh City on the Saigon River.

Leaving Ho Chi Minh City on the Saigon River.

After an hour of repeatedly shutting the ‘wall’ (and trying to hold it shut) and four phone calls, three men finally showed up at our door to fix the problem. I’d been sitting there working on my computer and holding it closed while Michael finished getting ready.

Phil Birsh, President and CEO of Playbill, stopped us in the hall later in the day, apologized and asked us if it was okay if he used it as a funny story to tell that night before the concert. We said ‘yes’. He, of course, embellished the story and had everybody laughing. He added that Peggy Sue and Champ and Michael and I had already booked Italy (BOTHS7) and had requested adjoining rooms. It was pretty funny.

Talking Miss Saigon with Liz Calloway, Seth Rudetsky & Norm Lewis.

Talking Miss Saigon with Liz Calloway, Seth Rudetsky & Norm Lewis.

A day at sea is a little more relaxed than an excursion day but full of programing with the Broadway stars. First, Seth Rudetsky hosted a talk about Miss Saigon with Liz Calloway who played Ellen in the original Broadway company (and had a baby a month before it went into production), and Norm Lewis who played John later in the run.

That was followed by a talk, later in the afternoon, with the legendary Tommy Tune– who’d been a surprise guest on the cruise, talking about his career.

Tommy Tune.

Tommy Tune.

Before dinner, Michael and I went up to the deck that overlooks the pool and found a bat hanging in the corner, just inside door. We had to get a crew member to come remove it because we thought it might scare someone, or God forbid, start flying around inside the ship. Yes, these things happen to us.

The concert that night was with Lindsay Mendez. Of course it was wonderful. We were thrilled to finally see her performing live for the first time.

The incredible Lindsay Mendez.

The incredible Lindsay Mendez.

The finally event of the night was Playbill After Dark. Seth Rudetsky hosted a Broadway trivia game and we won a 2016 Playbill calendar. It was quite an adventure for the first full day aboard ship.

The Heat Is On In Saigon

On the Vespa tour of Ho Chi Minh City.

On the Vespa tour of Ho Chi Minh City.

Southeast Asia Travel Day Eight: We had breakfast early and then had to check out of the hotel before our tour this morning. We almost didn’t book this Vespa tour… so very glad we did! It made up for the shortcomings in yesterday’s tour and then some. If we had only gone on yesterday’s and not today’s, I’d have said I didn’t really see much in Saigon. Luckily, choosing to ride all through Ho Chi Minh City on a motorbike was the best thing we could have done. The experience itself was pretty thrilling. Add to that, all the sights we visited and we really got an opportunity to see and feel the vibe of the city.

The tour was with Vespa Adventures and there were 10 in our group plus our guide, Yu. We each had a driver—all we had to do was enjoy the ride and not fall off. My driver was Gai and she was definitely skilled at manipulating the bike through some pretty tight situations. I have video I’ll try to post later. It’s too difficult to just describe how crazy the traffic is; combining all the motorbikes and cars is intense for an outsider.

Visiting the bird park.

Visiting the bird park.

We started out at what is known as a bird park. Residents bring their birds (in cages) to socialize and learn how to sing and fly from other birds. I thought this was pretty unique and certainly something you don’t see in the states. There’s a little outdoor café there and people sell treats for the birds like grasshoppers and crickets.

Next we visited the monument for Thich Quang Duc. He was the Buddhist Monk who burned himself to death at a busy intersection in Saigon. He did this to protest the persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government on June 11, 1963. This was a pretty powerful moment. Our guide Yu, turned us around from the monument and showed us the exact spot where it happened. One person can make a difference. The photo of this tragic event was seen around the world; for the first time bringing worldwide attention to what was happening here.

Thich Quang Duc, a Buddhist monk, burns himself to death on a Saigon street June 11, 1963 to protest alleged persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government. (AP Photo/Malcolm Browne)

Thich Quang Duc, a Buddhist monk, burns himself to death on a Saigon street June 11, 1963 to protest alleged persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government. (AP Photo/Malcolm Browne)

 

The monument to Thich Quang Duc.

The monument to Thich Quang Duc.

We visited three more beautiful temples, each as different as they were alike. We did have to remove our shoes at one of them, as is the custom, showing our respect.

A temple courtyard in Saigon.

A temple courtyard in Saigon.

 

Inside one of the Buddhist temples in Ho Chi Minh City.

Inside one of the Buddhist temples in Ho Chi Minh City.

Natural medicine being assembled at one of many city pharmacies.

Natural medicine being assembled at one of many city pharmacies.

At a pharmacy, we were able to watch natural medicines being assembled for a variety of ailments. Many are delivered to customers and then brewed into teas by the person in search of a cure.

Pho 24 was our stop for lunch. I can now say I’ve had authentic Vietnamese Pho soup. Pho soup is basically a fresh clear broth with noodles, meat and seasoning. I prefer Pho Ga (chicken). It is both delicious and filling.

 

The flower market in Ho Chi Minh City.

The flower market in Ho Chi Minh City.

After talking with our guide, we made a little change in our tour and she took us through a fish and flower markets. In the flower market we also went down a maze of alleys and were able to see some of the small rooms and apartments people call home. I’d guess most of these tight alleys couldn’t be more than three feet wide.

 

We were supposed to go through the highway tunnels out to a spot for a great view of the skyline, which we did—as it started to pour. We pulled over long enough to put on rain ponchos and then continued but didn’t stop at the spot due to the rain. It was a typical tropical downpour and didn’t last long.

Our group taking a refreshment break during our tour.

Our group taking a refreshment break during our tour.

Our last stop was near what was the U. S. Embassy during the Vietnam War. From that spot we could see where the last helicopter lifted people to safety from the roof of the Embassy. It was another powerful moment personalizing history to childhood memories.

The last helicopter to leave Saigon as the city fell in 1975.

The last helicopter to leave Saigon as the city fell in 1975.

 

The top of the old U.S. Embassy where the last helicopter flew people to safety during the fall of Saigon.

The top of the old U.S. Embassy where the last helicopter flew people to safety during the fall of Saigon.

The Vespa Tour made the trip to Ho Chi Minh City complete. It’s a must do for anyone wanting to get a great, short introduction to the city.

All Aboard. In the afternoon we were driven to the port and finally boarded the Ponant ship, Le Soleal for the actual Broadway On The High Seas 5 cruise. We had the always annoying (but mandatory) safety drill (this one was especially bad) followed by dinner.

The first concert of our cruise was given by two-time Tony Award Winner, Christine Ebersole. It was magical. The perfect start to many wonderful performances we’d be blessed with on this year’s BOTHS5 cruise.

 

Christine Ebersole gave the first concert of Broadway On The High Seas 5.

Christine Ebersole gave the first concert of Broadway On The High Seas 5.

 

Christine Ebersole with special guest Norm Lewis.

Christine Ebersole with special guest Norm Lewis.

Good Morning, Vietnam

Southeast Asia Travel Day Seven: We were fortunate to be staying at the beautiful Intercontinental Asiana Saigon. We got a good night’s sleep and enjoyed a breakfast at leisure to start the day. This morning everyone boarded buses for an all day tour of Ho Chi Minh City. The older population and those in northern Vietnam still refer to it as Saigon.

Notre Dame Cathedral

Notre Dame Cathedral

Our first stop was at Notre Dame Cathedral. While an overwhelming majority of the population is Buddhist (over 90%), the Catholic cathedral is still a popular location for wedding photos because of the beauty of the building as a backdrop.

Near the cathedral is the historic Saigon Central Post Office. We met an 85-year-old man that goes there daily to help anyone that needs assistance translating letters. He offers his time as a free service from the goodness of his heart.

Saigon Central Post Office

Saigon Central Post Office

 

This gentleman helps with translations every day.

This gentleman helps with translations every day.

Reunification Palace

Reunification Palace

Next, we visited the Reunification Palace. Formerly known as Independence Palace, this was the location of the final assault during the Vietnam War; where a tank crashed through the gates at 11:30 AM April 30, 1975.

This spot was of personal significance to me– linking history to my childhood memories of a war I was well aware of; but didn’t understand, while I was growing up.

 

April 30, 1975

April 30, 1975

 

The gates of the Reunification Palace.

The gates of the Reunification Palace.

 

Inside a temple in Ho Chi Minh City.

Inside a temple in Ho Chi Minh City.

Following lunch in a large garden restaurant, we visited a small temple, tucked peacefully into the chaos of the city.

I have to say I was a little disappointed in the tour. Even though we visited a variety of locations, I didn’t feel like I’d gotten any real feel for the city. You can’t absorb everything in such a short time but it’s nice when you can get enough of a taste to feel the essence of the city and its people.

 

Incense coils hanging from the temple ceiling.

Incense coils hanging from the temple ceiling.

 

Power lines in Saigon.

Power lines in Saigon.

Michael and I were both amused by the way electric service was maintained. Need power? Just run another cable… and another and another. Throughout the city you see large bunches of tangled wire stretching from pole to pole.

After a break back at the hotel, we were bussed out to Binh Quoi Village for the big welcome dinner. Everyone (200 plus) on the Broadway On the High Seas 5 cruise were together for the first time, celebrating the kick off of the actual cruise. The ‘village’ is a beautiful park and pavilion decorated with Chinese lanterns and colored lights. We were greeted with drinks and appetizers as we strolled down a path past a wide variety of artisans demonstrating their crafts, a clever puppet show and Chinese dragons leading the way to the center of the village.

The path through the village.

The path through the village.

Candles floating in the water near the pavilion.

Candles floating in the water near the pavilion.

As part of the entertainment, we were treated to two numbers from the musical Miss Saigon as teasers for what we’d see on board. Liz Callaway, the original Ellen (Chris’ wife) in the Broadway production; was joined by Lindsay Mendez on the wonderful duet, I Still Believe. Then Norm Lewis who played John on Broadway, energized the audience with his dazzling performance of the anthem, Bui Doi.

Local talent filled the rest of the evening; a pleasant backdrop as people mingled and relaxed under the stars.

Liz Callaway

Liz Callaway

 

Lindsay Mendez

Lindsay Mendez

 

Norm Lewis

Norm Lewis

 

Hello, Goodbye

Southeast Asia Travel Day Six: Our last morning in Cambodia, breakfast then off to the airport. We were sad to say goodbye to our guide, Jun. He’s a great guy and a terrific guide. One of the best I’ve ever encountered. Jun didn’t just point things out and spout memorized facts. He was genuinely passionate about it. Jun and Peaches from Trails of Indochina really made everything about our three days in Siem Riep perfect.

There was a little drama when we got to the airport. First they were shifting our group from one counter to another and we had to deal with some awfully cranky ticket agents. I think I jinxed us by posting that we had no delays with our previous flights. Our flight from Siem Riep, Cambodia to Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam ended up being delayed about two hours.

When it was finally time to board, Michael went through and I got pulled to the side. One of our friends, Mary, was laughing— “What did you do?” Then she and her husband George got pulled too. The laughing stopped. The gate agents moved us from the front of the plane to the back, a row in front of each other.

Once onboard, the woman next to me wanted to switch because her friend was in front of her. It worked out great because then I got to sit with Mary and George. Michael was still at the front of the plane and we were about 30 rows behind. The good news is that we were able to board and exit at the back of the plane and didn’t have to wait for the usual crowded aisles.

When it came time for the safety video, the screen above our heads decided to throw a fit. It kept lowering and raising, opening and closing, over and over. This got Mary and I laughing, though George, who isn’t crazy about flying—was not amused.

The bus ride from the airport was insane. Traffic, amplified by the ridiculous number of motorbikes, made traffic in New York City or Chicago look like driving in a small town. Michael compared it to the swarm that develops when you step on an anthill. It was pretty intense.

Instead of getting to the hotel after 4 PM, we didn’t get in until after 7 PM. We were pretty tired. After checking in, Michael and I just went up to the lounge on the 19th floor, checked out the view and had a snack. We had a full day tour the next day. I think I fell asleep as soon as I hit the sheets.

 

IMG_2653

Ho Chi Minh City at night.

Last Day In Cambodia

Southeast Asia Travel Day Five: We slept a little later this morning and still managed to beat most of our group down to breakfast. It’s so quiet and relaxed here. Even with the rush of people coming and going there’s still a peaceful air about things here.

The shore near the boat dock at Tonle Sap Lake.

The shore near the boat dock at Tonle Sap Lake.

After breakfast, we boarded coach buses to transport us out to the river that would carry us to the floating village on the banks of Tonle Sap Lake. There was one rather lengthy delay with traffic stopped in both directions due to road construction… just a subtle reminder of home.

On Tonle Sap Lake.

On Tonle Sap Lake.

Tonle Sap Lake. It was nice and hot by the time we reached the boat launch for our cruise around Tonle Sap Lake. There is a whole community that literally lives on the lake. Homes, stores, schools, churches and restaurants float near the shoreline. What’s really interesting is that they don’t use the water for anything–not even washing clothes– because it is pretty muddy and not safe to drink.

This young boy contributes to his family's income by giving visitors back massages.

This young boy contributes to his family’s income by giving visitors back massages.

There was a young boy on our boat that gave nearly everyone on board a short back and shoulder massage. We were each encouraged to give him a dollar. He goes to school and this was how he helps support his family.

From the boat, we headed to a local restaurant for lunch before returning to the hotel.

Welcome Dinner and Show. Our last night in Cambodia, the entire group that came to Siem Riep for the BOTHS5 pre-cruise were together for the first time. About half were staying at another hotel nearby.

Behind the pool area at our hotel (Raffles) was an open air space with a stage. It was set up– with no better words to describe it—like a large wedding reception. Around the perimeter of the space were many food stations with different foods being prepared, similar to a buffet.

Local dancers entertained with traditional dances.

Local young people entertained with traditional dances.

After introductions, the show consisted of young local performers sharing different forms of traditional dance. We recognized a few of them as wait staff from the hotel.

The best part of the evening was a pleasant surprise. We were reunited with a wonderful woman named Janet we met on the Baltic cruise two years ago.

Cambodian Takeaways. Dogs. I saw quite a few dogs in Cambodia. They all appeared to be descendants of the same breed. Dogs in Cambodia are not domesticated the way they are in the U.S. and can be seen wandering about and sometimes sleeping in the parks and streets. I didn’t see much interaction with people; they seemed to just coexist.

Bug Spray and Shorts. We were told ahead of time to bring bug spray for our excursions. It may just be the time of year but we never needed it. We were also told we needed to dress modestly; no bare shoulders and no shorts when visiting temples. As it turned out, this didn’t apply to the ancient ruins or any of the other places we visited in Cambodia. I didn’t even bother to pack shorts because of the advance warning and I really wish I had. With temperatures in the 90s and high humidity, I spent most days soaked in sweat and more uncomfortable than I needed to be.

A Proud and Gracious Culture. In spite of its shortcomings, Cambodians seem to be proud citizens. They are realistic and still thankful for they have. I never got the feeling from anyone we talked with that there was anger towards the government; or a sense of entitlement that so many Americans seem to possess. All the people we saw or met were friendly and gracious. Not one person ever responded with anything less than a smile.

Tourism is still a small but very important part of the economy in Cambodia. The people are well aware that it (tourism) is growing by leaps and bounds in other nearby countries such as Vietnam. A day didn’t go by without multiple people thanking us for choosing to visit their community.

It’s difficult when you visit other cultures and see people that work so hard and have so little—they might have little food or lack conveniences like electricity; yet they still seem happy and content. It makes you stop and reevaluate what you have and what you take for granted.

The floating village on Tonle Sap Lake.

The floating village on Tonle Sap Lake.

 

One of many floating homes on Tonle Sap Lake.

One of many floating homes on Tonle Sap Lake.

The Majestic Beauty of the Angkors

Southeast Asia Travel Day Four: Michael and I were both up and wide awake way too early this morning. Not that unusual for me but Michael is usually a good sleeper. Between jet lag and the exciting day ahead, it was difficult to go back to sleep.

Silly Selfies at Ta Prohm.

Silly Selfies at Ta Prohm.

We were the first ones at breakfast and there was an incredible spread. So many choices from traditional breakfast to local cuisine– everything that Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor does is first class.

In regards to this trip, today was probably my most anticipated day. That can be dangerous this early in a long vacation but there are also so many unique and exciting things ahead. As a precaution, I try not to allow my expectations to be too high; just to avoid any chance of disappointment.

Today did not disappoint.

Today was one of those few days in your life you’ll remember forever. A whirlwind of experiences that totally consumes you. Every sense heightened and challenged. Memories indelibly imprinted in your mind.

I have a bit of an obsession with history and what was left behind. I’m not as consumed by the facts as I am the aura of the experience. To put it bluntly: I like old things.

History not only connects us from the past to where we are now; it connects us metaphysically to all the people that came before us. For me, it’s magic. It gives me chills. There’s nothing else like it in the world.

On the Road to… This was our first opportunity to meet some of the people that would be continuing on with the Broadway On the High Seas 5 (BOTHS5) cruise. About 80 of the nearly 300 BOTHS5 participants came to Siem Riep for the 3-day pre-cruise adventure. As we’d find out later, the group was pretty evenly divided between three choices of hotels; then split again into groups of about a dozen for our tour experiences in Siem Riep. This gave us a perfect opportunity to meet new friends, more intimately; prior to the whole group coming together in Ho Chi Minh (Saigon) in a few days.

On the road in our tuk-tuk.

On the road in our tuk-tuk.

We all boarded tuk-tuks for the short ride to Angkor Wat. What a fun and relaxing way to travel!

Some tuk-tuks are bicycle-driven but most are now powered by motor bikes.

We were all connected to our guide, Jun, by headset so he was able to narrate the sites along the way.

Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat. Depending on the source, Angkor Wat is frequently called the unofficial 8th wonder of the world. It’s often on lists of must see places in your lifetime. I think all the Angkor temples (as a group) should be included.

Bas Reliefs at Angkor Wat.

Bas Reliefs at Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat was built in the early part of the 12th century, over a 30 year period. The workmanship is almost impossible to comprehend. From a distance, it looks like a massive, crumpling stone ruin. As you get closer, the impressive detail begin to be revealed. There are so many elements to be appreciated. The bas reliefs alone contain more than 12,000 square feet of intricate sandstone carvings. What stands out most about Angkor Wat from the other temples is the size. It’s pretty incredible that it has survived the centuries and much of the detail is in such good condition.

 

Inside the heart of Angkor Wat.

Inside the heart of Angkor Wat.

 

Looking up in one of the entries in Angkor Wat.

Looking up in one of the entries in Angkor Wat.

 

One of the statues of Budha.

One of the statues of Budha.

 

Monks can be seen throughout Angkor Wat.

Monks can be seen throughout Angkor Wat.

 

Incredibly detailed exterior walls protect the inner temple.

Incredibly detailed exterior walls protect the inner temple.

 

One of the Angkor Wat towers and balconies.

One of the Angkor Wat towers and balconies.

 

A cemetery at Angkor Wat.

A cemetery at Angkor Wat.

Tomb Raider, Jungle Temple or Ta Prohm? Here is a spot that nearly everyone is familiar with, even if they don’t realize it. Most famously recognized from Tomb Raider, Ta Prohm has survived from its origins in the mid 12th century.

The famous Banyan tree root snakes its way through the temple.  There are hundreds of statues in the complex. Ta Prohm is under a long, delicate preservation and restoration process. Primarily, this involves structural strengthening to prevent any further, rapid deterioration.

The famous Banyan root at Ta Prohm.

The famous Banyan root at Ta Prohm.

 

The Banyan tree rising out of the temple.

The Banyan tree rising out of the temple.

 

Deteriorating but naturally beautiful.

Deteriorating but naturally beautiful.

 

Angkor Thom. It means the great city. It is the temple of faces. Each tower has four carved faces so they can be seen from any direction. Angkor Thom was the final capital of Khmer Empire. The city was surrounded by a wall with  causeways lined with 54 statues on each side leading to the entry towers. Inside the ruins is the magnificent Bayon Temple… a sight to behold.

 

The causeway and entryway to Angkor Thom.

The causeway and entryway to Angkor Thom.

 

Statues lining the causeway.

Statues lining the causeway.

 

The Bayon Temple of Angkor Thom.

The Bayon Temple of Angkor Thom.

 

Looking down in the maze of pathways at Angkor Thom.

Looking down in the maze of pathways at Angkor Thom.

 

Four faces surround every tower.

Four faces surround every tower.

 

I took nearly 800 photos today. In an effort to try and keep up with posting here, I’m only sharing a few now. Later I’ll do a couple photo essay posts with many more pictures of the Angkor temples. This was such an incredible experience.

Just Clowning Around: Cambodian Circus-Style

Southeast Asia Travel Day Three (Part Two): After a short nap, we went across the French gardens in front our hotel to check out the Flying Foxes that hang in the trees. Cambodian Flying Foxes are actually large fruit bats. Their wings can span up to five feet. In late afternoon and early evening you can see them flying from the trees.

IMG_1598

Cambodian Flying Foxes.

Tonight was the only night that we didn’t have dinner or tour plans while in Siem Riep. Researching various options, Michael found us a dinner and show package just around the corner from our hotel.

Phare, The Cambodian Circus. After exploring some of the local streets, we arrived at the Phare complex and were immediately enamored with the quaint and magical atmosphere. There’s a charming midway, gift shop full of beautiful items made by local artisans, the cafe and the big top circus tent. We arrived at the Phare Cafe for a really nice dinner before an evening at the circus. The food was incredibly good and ridiculously inexpensive.

 

The midway at Phare, the Cambodian Circus.

The midway at Phare, the Cambodian Circus.

Phare blends circus arts with artistic expression. All of Phare’s productions have elements of Cambodian history and culture embedded in the story. Their goals are to build tourism and community development; through their students- building human development and social change.

“Phare Performing Social Enterprise has three complimentary social missions: Provide gainful employment to Cambodian youth from difficult social and economic backgrounds, financially sustain our parent organization Phare Ponleu Selpak NGO school thereby contributing to the rebirth of Cambodian modern art.” — Phare website

The ghosts in Preu (Chiils).

The ghosts in Preu (Chills).

The show we saw was called Preu (Chills). It was about a group of students, haunted by ghosts. Through them, they they find ways to face their fears and anxieties.

These young performers and musicians are wonderfully skilled entertainers. It was a fun and excited experience and a great introduction into Cambodian life and culture.

 

The talented student performers of Phare.

The talented student performers of Phare.

 

Musicians sit high above the big top floor adding drama to the performance.

Musicians sit high above the big top floor adding drama to the performance.

 

Phare, The Cambodian Circus

Phare, The Cambodian Circus

Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor

Southeast Asia Travel Day Three: We arrived at the beautiful Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor at 11 AM, November 1st, not expecting to be able to check in until 4 PM. We’d packed a carry on so we could use the pool while we waited– but as luck would have it, we were able to check as soon as we arrived.

IMG_1554The historic 5-star hotel first opened in 1932. It welcomed the beginning of travelers coming to the region to visit the ancient Angkor temples.

It is situated on 15 acres which includes several classic French gardens and boasts the largest swimming pool in Cambodia.

We couldn’t have selected a better place to call home for the three days we’re in Siem Riep. Everything about it is classic. It has the desired modern amenities while maintaining all of its original, traditional charm.

The entire staff is very friendly, helpful and perfectly accommodating. They truly go out of their way to make you comfortable and welcomed. It’s a luxurious experience without the pretense.

We checked in, briefly settled into our room; then did a little exploring of the grounds before returning to our room for a much needed nap.

Raffles Grand Hotel d'Angkor.

Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor.

 

Raffles pool is the largest in Cambodia.

Raffles pool is the largest in Cambodia.

 

The working, vintage lift.

The working, vintage lift.

 

Our Room facing the balcony.

Our Room facing the balcony.

 

Our room in the original 1930's building of the Raffles Grand Hotel d'Angkor.

Our room in the original 1930’s building of the Raffles Grand Hotel d’Angkor.

 

The view from our balcony.

The view from our balcony.